Popular Science

100 Mysteries of Science Explained

    lovycompartió una citael año pasado
    Even in all theoretical scenarios in which we travel faster than light, we can never travel backward in time, only forward. However, many scientists believe that traveling into the future is still a possibility that just needs more study.
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    A gamma ray burst is a focused stream of energy that can last from just a few seconds to several minutes. Just one 10-second burst releases more energy than our Sun will produce over its 10-billion-year lifetime
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    To have a notion of temperature, you need to have a notion of interaction
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    The Moon seems larger when it is near the horizon than when it is high in the sky, a phenomenon called the Moon illusion
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    as Hawking notes, Earth was lucky to avoid a cataclysmic collision with an asteroid or comet in the past 70 million years. Other planets could have had their early life-forms wiped out in such a cosmic crash.
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    Despite what you may have heard, diamonds are not forever. Given enough time, your sparkling rock will degrade into common graphite. The carbon atoms that constitute that diamond, however, are forever, or close enough. Stable isotopes of carbon are thought to enjoy lifetimes that extend far longer than the estimated age of the universe
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    Albert Einstein studied this effect and came up with a compelling theory that stated light was both wave and particle.
    Khen Sween Pangcompartió una citahace 3 años
    A clearer understanding of the composition of dark matter could help scientists better understand the nature of our universe—especially, how galaxies hold together.
    Khen Sween Pangcompartió una citahace 3 años
    But a phenomenon known as gyroscopic precession is the key to making a returning boomerang come back to its thrower. “When the boomerang spins, one wing is actually moving through the air faster than the other [relative to the air] as the boomerang is moving forward as a whole,” explains Darren Tan, a PhD student in physics at Oxford University. “As the top wing is spinning forward, the lift force on that wing is greater and results in unbalanced forces that gradually turn the boomerang.” The difference in lift force between the two sides of the boomerang produces a consistent torque that makes the boomerang turn. It soars through the air and gradually loops back around in a circle.
    Khen Sween Pangcompartió una citahace 3 años
    One thorn in the argument for light-as-a-wave purists is a phenomenon called the photoelectric effect. When light shines on a metal surface, electrons fly out. But higher intensity of light does not cause more electrons to be released, as you would expect with the wave theory. Albert Einstein studied this effect and came up with a compelling theory that stated light was both wave and particle. Light flows toward a metal surface as a wave of particles, and electrons release from the metal as an interaction with a single photon, or particle of light, rather than the wave as a whole. The energy from that photon transfers to a single electron, knocking it free from the metal. Einstein’s declaration of wave-particle duality earned him the Nobel Prize in physics in 1921.
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