How to Use Your Mind. A Psychology of Study, Harry D.Kitson
en
Gratis
Harry D.Kitson

How to Use Your Mind. A Psychology of Study

kingrsmea
kingrsmeacompartió una citahace 4 años
"Read not to contradict, nor to believe, but to weigh and consider."
b7614471096
b7614471096compartió una citahace 5 meses
A better way is to read through an entire paragraph or section, then close the book and reproduce in your own words what you have read.
jamaclulu
jamaclulucompartió una citahace 2 años
You cannot make a wrong decision if you have the facts before you and have given each the proper weight. When the solution comes, it is recognized as right, for it comes tinged with a feeling that we call belief.
Emonisha1312
Emonisha1312compartió una citahace 4 años
Notes you take now as a student may be valuable years hence in professional life.
Rachel Brown
Rachel Browncompartió una citahace 5 años
You cannot make a wrong decision if you have the facts before you and have given each the proper weight. When the solution comes, it is recognized as right, for it comes tinged with a feeling that we call belief.
Оля
Оляcompartió una citahace 2 años
Stimulate brain activity by the method suggested in Chapter X, namely, by means of muscular activity.
Оля
Оляcompartió una citahace 2 años
Go slowly, then, in impressing material for the first time. As you look up the words of a foreign language in the lexicon, trying to memorize their English equivalents, take plenty of time. Obtain
WSY
WSYcompartió una citahace 3 años
tactual images of things touched; auditory images of things heard; gustatory images of things tasted; olfactory images of things smelled.
b9052627674
b9052627674compartió una citahace 3 años
A worthy ideal for every student to follow is expressed in the motto carved on the wall of the great reading-room of the Harper Memorial Library at The University of Chicago: "Read not to contradict, nor to believe, but to weigh and consider." Ibsen bluntly states the same thought:
"Don't read to swallow; read to choose, for 'Tis but to see what one has use for."
Ask yourself, when beginning a printed discussion, What am I looking for? What is the author going to talk about? Often this will be indicated in topical headings. Keep it in the background of your mind while reading, and search for the answer. Then, when you have read the necessary portion, close the book and summarize, to see if the author furnished what you sought. In short, always read for a purpose. Formulate problems and seek their solutions. In this way will there be direction in your reading and your thought.
b9052627674
b9052627674compartió una citahace 3 años
A better way is to read through an entire paragraph or section, then close the book and reproduce in your own words what you have read. Next, take your summary and compare with the original text to see that you have really grasped the point. This procedure will be beneficial in several ways. It will encourage continuous concentration of attention to an entire argument; it will help you to preserve relative emphasis of parts; it will lead you to regard thought and not words.
Elizaveta Tomilova
Elizaveta Tomilovacompartió una citahace 3 años
READINGS AND EXERCISES
NOTE.—Numbers in parentheses refer to complete citations in
Bibliography at end of book.
Readings: Fulton (5) Lockwood (11)
Exercise 1. List concrete problems that have newly come to you since your arrival upon the campus.
Exercise 2. List in order the difficulties that confront you in preparing your daily lessons.
Exercise 3. Prepare a work schedule similar to that provided by the form in Chart I. Specify the subject with which you will be occupied at each period.
Exercise 4. Try to devise some way of registering the effectiveness with which you carry out your schedule. Suggestions are contained in the summary: Disposition of (1) as planned; (2) as spent. To di
Kanykei Temirbekova
Kanykei Temirbekovacompartió una citahace 4 años
free, then, to work upon the subject-matter of the lecture. Debate mentally with the speaker. Question his statements, comparing them with your own experience or with the results of your study.
Emonisha1312
Emonisha1312compartió una citahace 4 años
habits are most easily formed in youth, for this is the period when nerve tissue is most easily impressed and modified.
Chit Shar
Chit Sharcompartió una citahace 4 años
In the grades the book cannot be put into the hands of the pupils, but it should be mastered by the teacher and applied in her supervising and teaching activities
anisha07jhawar
anisha07jhawarcompartió una citahace 5 años
acquaintance with the objects of your environment
tladikgaogelo2
tladikgaogelo2compartió una citahace 5 días
Don't read to swallow; read to choose, for 'Tis but to see what one has use for."
tladikgaogelo2
tladikgaogelo2compartió una citahace 5 días
Read not to contradict, nor to believe, but to weigh and consider
tladikgaogelo2
tladikgaogelo2compartió una citahace 5 días
A better way is to read through an entire paragraph or section, then close the book and reproduce in your own words what you have read.
tladikgaogelo2
tladikgaogelo2compartió una citahace 5 días
A better way is to read through an entire paragraph or section, then close the book and reproduce in your own words what you have read
tladikgaogelo2
tladikgaogelo2compartió una citahace 5 días
iscussion, not a duplication of it. Students
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