Seneca's Letters from a Stoic, Seneca, A to Z Classics
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Seneca,A to Z Classics

Seneca's Letters from a Stoic

utiuts
utiutscompartió una citael mes pasado
He who craves riches feels fear on their account. No man, however, enjoys a blessing that brings anxiety; he is always trying to add a little more. While he puzzles over increasing his wealth, he forgets how to use it. He collects his accounts, he wears out the pavement in the forum, he turns over his ledger, – in short, he ceases to be master and becomes a steward. Farewell.
utiuts
utiutscompartió una citael mes pasado
what difference does it make who spoke the words? They were uttered for the world.
utiuts
utiutscompartió una citael mes pasado
"He who needs riches least, enjoys riches most." "Author's name, please!" you say. Now, to show you how generous I am, it is my intent to praise the dicta of other schools. The phrase belongs to Epicurus, or Metrodorus, or some one of that particular thinking-shop.
utiuts
utiutscompartió una citael mes pasado
Even bad fortune is fickle. Perhaps it will come, perhaps not; in the meantime it is not. So look forward to better things.
utiuts
utiutscompartió una citael mes pasado
"Epicurus," you reply, "uttered these words; what are you doing with another's property?" Any truth, I maintain, is my own property. And I shall continue to heap quotations from Epicurus upon you, so that all persons who swear by the words of another, and put a value upon the speaker and not upon the thing spoken, may understand that the best ideas are common property.
utiuts
utiutscompartió una citael mes pasado
Our span of life is divided into parts; it consists of large circles enclosing smaller. One circle embraces and bounds the rest; it reaches from birth to the last day of existence. The next circle limits the period of our young manhood. The third confines all of childhood in its circumference. Again, there is, in a class by itself, the year; it contains within itself all the divisions of time by the multiplication of which we get the total of life. The month is bounded by a narrower ring. The smallest circle of all is the day; but even a day has its beginning and its ending, its sunrise and its sunset. 7. Hence Heraclitus, whose obscure style gave him his surname, remarked: "One day is equal to every day." Different persons have interpreted the saying in different ways. Some hold that days are equal in number of hours, and this is true; for if by "day" we mean twenty-four hours' time, all days must be equal, inasmuch as the night acquires what the day loses. But others maintain that one day is equal to all days through resemblance, because the very longest space of time possesses no element which cannot be found in a single day, – namely, light and darkness, – and even to eternity day makes these alternations more numerous, not different when it is shorter and different again when it is longer. 8. Hence, every day ought to be regulated as if it closed the series, as if it rounded out and completed our existence.
utiuts
utiutscompartió una citael mes pasado
2. I was angry, and I embraced the first opportunity to vent my spleen in the bailiff's presence. "It is clear," I cried, "that these plane-trees are neglected; they have no leaves. Their branches are so gnarled and shrivelled; the boles are so rough and unkempt! This would not happen, if someone loosened the earth at their feet, and watered them." The bailiff swore by my protecting deity that "he was doing everything possible, and never relaxed his efforts, but those trees were old." Between you and me, I had planted those trees myself, I had seen them in their first leaf.
utiuts
utiutscompartió una citael mes pasado
What has the future in store for me, if stones of my own age are already crumbling?
Cille Naerbout
Cille Naerboutcompartió una citahace 2 meses
He who craves riches feels fear on their account. No man, however, enjoys a blessing that brings anxiety; he is always trying to add a little more. While he puzzles over increasing his wealth, he forgets how to use it. He collects his accounts, he wears out the pavement in the forum, he turns over his ledger, – in short, he ceases to be master and becomes a steward. Farewell.
Cille Naerbout
Cille Naerboutcompartió una citahace 2 meses
because an important part of one's safety lies in not seeking safety openly; for what one avoids, one condemns,
Cille Naerbout
Cille Naerboutcompartió una citahace 2 meses
Perhaps it will come, perhaps not; in the meantime it is not. So look forward to better things.
Cille Naerbout
Cille Naerboutcompartió una citahace 2 meses
suffer more often in imagination than in reality.
Cille Naerbout
Cille Naerboutcompartió una citahace 2 meses
Fortune has often in the past got the upper hand of you, and yet you have not surrendered, but have leaped up and stood your ground still more eagerly. For manliness gains much strength by being challenged;
Cille Naerbout
Cille Naerboutcompartió una citahace 2 meses
And I shall continue to heap quotations from Epicurus upon you, so that all persons who swear by the words of another, and put a value upon the speaker and not upon the thing spoken, may understand that the best ideas are common property. Farewell.
Cille Naerbout
Cille Naerboutcompartió una citahace 2 meses
And if God is pleased to add another day, we should welcome it with glad hearts. That man is happiest, and is secure in his own possession of himself, who can await the morrow without apprehension. When a man has said: "I have lived!", every morning he arises he receives a bonus.
Cille Naerbout
Cille Naerboutcompartió una citahace 2 meses
Let us, however, do from a good motive what he used to do from a debased motive; let us go to our sleep with joy and gladness; let us say:
I have lived; the course which Fortune set for me
Is finished.
Cille Naerbout
Cille Naerboutcompartió una citahace 2 meses
we must indeed have someone according to whom we may regulate our characters; you can never straighten that which is crooked unless you use a ruler
Cille Naerbout
Cille Naerboutcompartió una citahace 2 meses
what does your condition matter, if it is bad in your own eyes?
Cille Naerbout
Cille Naerboutcompartió una citahace 2 meses
Unblest is he who thinks himself unblest.
Cille Naerbout
Cille Naerboutcompartió una citahace 2 meses
e marvel at certain animals because they can pass through fire and suffer no bodily harm; but how much more marvellous is a man who has marched forth unhurt and unscathed through fire and sword and devastation! Do you understand now how much easier it is to conquer a whole tribe than to conquer one man?
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