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Libros
Yoji Yamakuse

Japaneseness

    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    From the Japanese perspective, the experience and improvement in spirit gained through the effort are more important than results.
    Ирина Осипенкоcompartió una citahace 8 meses
    Let’s say you wish to be considerate of another’s circumstances, but you do so in a rather obvious way: paying for their meal, for example. The result may be that the other person feels a sense of obligation and perhaps some emotional discomfort. If you are a truly considerate person, you might instead excuse yourself to go to the restroom and on the way catch the waiter to tell him you will settle the check separately and not to bring it to the table. Your goal is to make sure that there is a continuous feeling of well-being on the part of your guest and that nothing will disrupt the mood of the occasion. It is this type of unobtrusive consideration that lies at the heart of hospitality (omotenashi).
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    From the perspective of Westerners, who place a heavy emphasis on results in their business culture, the spirit of gudō, which places importance on process, must seem impractical.
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    truth-seeking
    What is truth-seeking? Follow where your teacher leads and remain quiet. Never worry about how you may look foolish as you study and devote yourself to the Way. Finally, develop heart.
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    In today’s business world, many aspects of gyō are also used in the mental or spiritual training of workers, such as task repetition, section rotation, group exercises, and even sloganeering.
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    Whiting points out that Japanese players do not simply practice baseball; they also place emphasis on the spiritual side in their training—paying respect to the ball field by keeping it clean, being properly deferential to their seniors, and even going so far as to sit in meditation in Zen temples. It must have been very clear to Whiting that the players were employing a particularly Japanese form of training, gyō, in order to reach the top of their game.
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    training
    What is training? You adopt an attitude of self-denial, refine your spirit, work on your skills. Now and then you must clean and purify yourself as you continue forward, eyes firmly on the Way.
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    Japan’s business culture, more so than in other countries, there is still more emphasis on and recognition of the value of effort for effort’s sake.
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    They tend to more highly value the effort put into the process than the result itself
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    The Japanese have traditionally liked the word doryoku (“effort”).
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    Kokkishin means, through spiritual training, conquering desire, fear, and other emotions in order to overcome the self.
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    self-denial
    The spirit of self-denial teaches you to be fully mindful as you follow the Way, eliminating distracting thoughts and loosing yourself of ego
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    managers must take responsibility for the mistakes of their subordinates.
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    In today’s business world in Japan this way of thinking can still be found, as duty to one’s company comes before individual gain, and company employees take care of their assignments with few questions.
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    ushidō taught the importance of controlling individual desires, not fearing death, and leading a simple life of integrity as one protected one’s lord. Samurai were thus expected to be taciturn, unswayed by events around them, able to remain calm and respond to danger at any time.
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    the way of the warrior
    Bushidō means “the Way of the Warrior.” Born in ancient times, it developed in the feudal era and still resides in the DNA of modern Japanese.
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    n keeping with their social values that they have cultivated since feudal times, the Japanese use the phrase dōri ni kanatta (“following reason”) to describe the actions of a person who pays proper respect to his elders, teachers, or superiors.
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    reason
    The clarity of its truth and inherent structure is the philosophy behind the Way, the overarching concept that keeps you from the temptation to stray and offering an answer when you ask why.
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    the word michi (or dō) is used metaphorically for the process of learning various kata as one proceeds down the road of life, doing what one must to become a more virtuous person.
    Anya Seishin Platunovacompartió una citahace 3 años
    way, road
    There is a path for right living and a path for right learning. Japanese observe the “way” because it subsumes everything in spirit and action.
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