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Davy Zyw

101 Champagnes and other Sparkling Wines

    Natasa Salaicompartió una citahace 2 años
    with a higher proportion of older vintage wines in the blend, so the wine style is richer, more flavoursome and complex. Paired with Krug’s famous use of oak barrels, this means that Krug’s style is one of the richest expressions of champagne there is. Krug houses the most diverse range of reserve wines in the whole of Champagne with access to over 150 wines spanning 10 vintages. With obsessive attention to detail and unfaltering patience, Olivier Krug (Joseph’s great-great-grandson) creates wines which are some of the best in the region, and some of the most prestigious. Krug is expensive, it is bottled time, and it’s worth it.

    Type: Champagne, brut, multi-vintage
    Style: Lemon meringue pie
    Price: £££
    Stockists: High street
    Toast:
    Food: Sourdough pizza with smoked mozzarella
    Occasion: Buying your first flat (if you have any money left)
    Website: www.lansonchampagne.com
    Tasting note: Notes of biscuit, shortbread and almonds smash into lemon, spun sugar and ripe apples. Intense and long, with sweet citrus, spice pineapple, samurai freshness and almond croissant notes – this is a champagne of incredible quality
    Natasa Salaicompartió una citahace 2 años
    KRUG GRAND CUVÉE

    IT DOESN’T GET MORE SPECIAL THAN KRUG: THE MOST EXPENSIVE, stylish and most luxurious champagne house there is. Krug is the undisputed king of champagne; all hail. And it is a well-known aphrodisiac to boot! But considering the lofty mystique Krug now enjoys, the story started from humble beginnings.
    German born Joseph Krug moved to France as a young man and cut his teeth working for Jacquesson Champagne. He was not content with the variable, inconsistent style produced in each vintage, and left at the age of 42 to create a champagne which didn’t yet exist: his own Champagne Krug.
    The variants in the weather mean that style and quality drastically alter from one year to the next. Joseph’s philosophy was craftsmanship without compromise; his goal was to produce the best champagne there had ever been, without the restrictions of vintage variation. He wanted to create a cuvée which was the best expression of champagne, every year without fail. What he achieved revolutionised champagne forever, and the Krug Champagne style is not only evident in bottles of Krug today, but in every house that produces multi-vintage styles.
    Krug’s non-vintage champagne contains a spread of different vintages
    Natasa Salaicompartió una citahace 2 años
    Brut nature / Zero dosage / Ultra brut: 0–2.5g sugar per bottle
    Natasa Salaicompartió una citahace 2 años
    but blanc de blancs made from white grapes and blanc de noirs made exclusively from red grapes are also important. Most of the world’s best sparkling wines mirror the grapes used in Champagne, particularly chardonnay as it is very versatile and grows well in most places. The grapes used in prosecco give a very different style of wine, simpler, with more flavour; the grapes in cava are different again.
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    Blanc de blancs, white champagne: 100% chardonnay, a white grape
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    Extra brut: 0–4.5g sugar per bottle
    Natasa Salaicompartió una citahace 2 años
    Extra sec / Extra dry: 9–13g
    Natasa Salaicompartió una citahace 2 años
    Sec: 13–24g sugar per bottle
    Natasa Salaicompartió una citahace 2 años
    Demi-sec: 24–37.5g sugar per
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    Doux: >37.5g sugar per bottle.
    Natasa Salaicompartió una citahace 2 años
    After the base wine is created and before the base wine is put into the bottle (for the start of the méthode traditionnelle) a chef de cave (head winemaker) may blend 30,000 different wines from different vineyards, areas, grapes varieties and different years (with diverse complexities of each vintage), to produce a consistent quality-driven wine. This not only showcases the house style, but the vintage and even the personality of the chef de cave. This is why, whether you drink Veuve Clicquot today or in 50 years’ time, you know that the distinctive orange label guarantees a certain style. Although the champagne will not be made from the same vineyards, wine or year, it will be a definitive showcase of the house style, expressing not only the winemaker’s signature, but providing a glimpse into the personality of the Widow Clicquot herself. Chapeau!
    The evolution of techniques has taken hundreds of years to refine and perfect which results in the ultimate expression we now find in our champagne and wine glasses today.
    Natasa Salaicompartió una citahace 2 años
    There are seven grapes permitted but the forgotten four are rarely used: pinot gris, pinot blanc, petit meslier and arbane.
    Natasa Salaicompartió una citahace 2 años
    Brut: 0–9g sugar per bottle
    Natasa Salaicompartió una citahace 2 años
    After the First World War, two of the largest markets collapsed due to the revolution in Russia and Prohibition, which stopped most sales into America from 1920 until 1933. The enterprising Champenois had to look elsewhere to sell their wines, and successfully achieved this in Germany and Britain, which are still the most important export markets for Champagne
    Natasa Salaicompartió una citahace 2 años
    For a long time champagne was called Devil’s Wine, because of the danger associated with the exploding bottles, which were responsible for many deaths. It would take hundreds of years to streamline and develop this process (now called méthode traditionnelle) in the chalk cellars of Champagne, making it safe and reliable. Outside of the Champagne region, modern technology has allowed winemakers to make sparkling wines by other means, creating wines which are more efficient to produce, less labour intensive and cheaper to make. These wines are made in one tank, rather than in individual bottles. The most famous of these wines is prosecco.
    ★ DID YOU KNOW?
    It is maintained that the reason wine bottles are 75cl is because this was the average breath of a glass blower
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    The United Kingdom is the most important market outside France.
    ★ DID YOU KNOW?
    Up until a couple of years ago London drank more champagne than the entire United States
    Natasa Salaicompartió una citahace 2 años
    Ciao ciao coupe!

    The most famous of champagne’s glasses has to be the shallow coupe, said to be modelled on the breasts of France’s queen Marie Antoinette. Although this glass was actually created specifically for sparkling wine in England in the 1690s, I still like to think Marie Antoinette’s desirable bosom had a part to play in the design
    Natasa Salaicompartió una citahace 2 años
    Limoux is a small, mountain-locked town in the Languedoc-Roussillon area of Mediterranean
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    Until the late 1700s the sparkling wines of Limoux and Champagne were made in a similar way to today’s artisan cider. After pressing the grapes, natural yeasts found in the winery would begin fermenting the grape juice into wine, converting the sugars of the grapes into alcohol
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    The breakthrough moment for all champagne production came in the nineteenth century, when a local French pharmacist, André François, trialled and discovered the precise measurement of sugar needed to create the sparkle in the bottles, without producing too much pressure. This is when champagne became the success story it is today. Production boomed from a mere 300,000 bottles a year to 20 million by the mid nineteenth century. Today close to 340 million bottles are produced each year.
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